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V for Vendetta 2006 [092805]

17 May

V for Vendetta

Years back, everybody raved about V for Vendetta, especially when it first hit the cinemas. All I knew about this particular film was that Natalie Portman’s head had been shaved and she still remained the beautiful actress that she was. Sure, I was interested in knowing exactly why they had to shave her head for this particular role in this movie, but not enough for me to actually make an effort and go out of my way to watch it. Up until recently, my friends would try “forcing” me into watching it but the time never seemed right, so I was never able to. Everything I heard about the movie, however, was positive and all I got from people were good reviews so when I found out we were to watch this, I was both thrilled and relieved. “Something mainstream, finally!”, I thought to myself. Not that I didn’t enjoy all of the other movies that we’ve seen, because I did… Well, most of them anyway. But, I guess it’s always been a notion of mine that the more recent a film was created, the more understandable and relatable it should be. I kind of got that impression from V for Vendetta.

During the entire duration of the film, it completely engrossed me. I found myself continuously asking my friends questions about it and I kept wanting to know what was going to happen next.

It intrigued me how the script was written so thoroughly and so profoundly that I was simply dumbstruck by the time the film reached the credits. Whoever knew that V, that creepy, almost menacing man (or whatever he really was) wearing the Guy Fawkes mask was actually the protagonist or hero in this movie, and not the villain, even before seeing the film must have been told of the plot beforehand. I honestly never would have guessed.

V is quite the character. I was quite amused at how the scriptwriter created this man, or creature, or whatever he is, to be. The way he spoke was simply poetic and he was just such a charismatic, amusing, though very dark, man that it was impossible not to like him. The way he was introduced in the film, his first full appearance, in where he saves Evey, it almost seemed a tad bit comedic because of his monologue and the way he presented himself. It made him seem somewhat unreal.

I already suspected a romance to bloom somewhere along the way. What I didn’t foresee however, was that he was that dark and intelligent of a man to have been able to simulate Evey’s abduction. In a way, it was to help Evey overcome her fear in which he succeeded, but I found myself appalled because even I was deceived, and I did not expect that at all. I guess I could say that one of the reasons why I enjoyed the film very much was because I could never tell what was to happen next and for the end of the film, I had absolutely no idea what to expect. I believe that it was only the budding romance of Evey and V that I could actually see coming. The way love is projected in the movie is different because of their dysfunctional characters, and yet, it can still be very much detected as love. It amazes me that even in a move such as this, love can still be injected into it and it can still “prevail”.

The last scene of the film was quite symbolic. The blowing up of Parliament didn’t exactly go as I thought it would. Yes, throughout the entire film, it brought about fear but at that very moment, when it was finally happening, the particular scene that got us all hyped, I felt what all of the others who were in possession of a Guy Fawkes mask that day, a sense of freedom, triumph and most of all, hope. That indeed there was all this for their country.

My favorite line of the movie was when Finch asks Evey, “Who was he?” and she replied with, “He was Edmond Dantés… and he was my father. And my mother… my brother… my friend. He was you… and me. He was all of us.” It encompassed V’s entire role in the film. He was someone who fought for everyone. He was a revolution in himself against this fascist government. He was V- The man who fought everyone’s battles and won.

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Posted by on 17 May 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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