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It’s Lonely at the Top : The Godfather II 1974 [092805]

25 May

Because I enjoyed the first film of The Godfather very much, I was very excited to see the sequel. I was not so sure of what to expect because most of the time, the sequel never matches up to the original movie. After seeing the film, as I said before, people were not wrong when they talked about The Godfather. IT WAS AMAZING. Some may compare the two films and say that the sequel was even better than the first but honestly, I cannot even compare. I did not know how the sequel was going to follow the first, as the original film was such a hit but amazingly, it did. It came to par with it and according to others, The Godfather, Part II may just be one of the best sequels of all time. It is inevitable to compare the first two films and like one better than the other but I must say, the two films are just two masterpieces in themselves.

I must say, having both Al Pacino and Robert Deniro two play the two “Godfathers” in one movie was a brilliant beyond brilliant idea. Obviously the two did an amazing job. Who wouldn’t love a movie with BOTH of these amazing actors? The Godfather, Part II easily compelled its viewers to watch it.

I don’t care that there are so many characters and so many events in the film that I find myself confused of what is going on. I loved it. The fact that I am confused makes me even more excited to watch it again.

The way the story of Michael Corleone as the current Godfather and the story of the young Don Vito Corleone as his father and predecessor juxtaposed with one another helped construct the film and make it into its own. Though Michael was his father’s son, it could be seen how the times changed him and how different his “methods” were from his father’s. Don Vito Corleone was the perfect example of someone who stood by the words, “FAMILY FIRST.” At first, you would think that Michael Corleone had the same sentiments. But little details in the film made me believe otherwise. I am sure that those were his intentions, of course, he wanted to follow the footsteps of his father that although they belonged to a mafia, morals stayed intact. He told Kay at the beginning of the film that his goal was to make the Corleone family ‘completely legitimate’, as he put it. However, I feel that he got too caught up with the family business. He was in deep. Hence, he forgot the idea and importance of ‘family’ to the point that his wife, Kay, wanted to leave him with the kids. Don Vito Corleone was a powerful man but it was so evident how his family gave him full support. Michael Corleone on the other hand, let the business take over his life. I find it ironic how Michael let the business destroy what it was supposed to protect: His family.

I liked how the stories of Al Pacino and Robert Deniro intertwined and contrasted with one another. The film basically showed the rise and fall of the Corleone family. From being all-powerful and almost invincible, it was evident when things started falling apart. Honestly, I kind of suspected that Michael would somehow ‘turn to the dark side’ at the end of the first The Godfather film. However, I thought that he would somehow be able to fix it in the second film, and instead things got worse. The relationship Michael had with his brother, his son, his wife- it just showed what could happen if he puts work above anything else. I felt bad because from the first film, I really was rooting for Al Pacino to play and stay the good guy. Unfortunately, things didn’t play out the way I wanted it to… But I still gotta give it to his acting skills.

I think it was a great idea for The Godfather, Part II to be shown in class right after The Godfather. It allowed us to compare two amazing films, though of the same story, two different films nevertheless. It made me appreciate what is said to be timeless. I must agree that this film is definitely one of the best of its time.

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Posted by on 25 May 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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