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You say you want a revolution

25 May

Films about a revolution fuelled by ideals are the kind that will spark a sense of patriotism in the hearts of a lot of film viewers. These are the sort of movies that inspire others to be just as committed to a cause to the point of rebellion against an oppressing norm. The backbone of this story relies on the concept that only through destruction of the self can people rebuild a better self for society.

The alternate reality of V for Vendetta’s universe is too controlled with not much room for liberal ideas or artistic freedom. The suppression of the government struck fear and docility into the people. The film tries to counter that scary thought by saying that the people should not be afraid of their government; it should be the government that is afraid of its people. It would be horrible to exist in a world that would arrest and kill anyone who takes a stab at the government. Enforced curfews should only be done in times of great crisis and not to muffle the voices of the people at night. To silence their cries would only allow them to boil over until the world becomes one molten mess of discontent and death of its souls.

Other films that share their views on the need for self-destruction would be Fight Club and Batman: the Dark Knight. Sometime anarchy is essential in toppling a ruling class which does not do their people any good but only furthers their personal gain and political agenda.

The story is built on the concept of the immortality of ideas. How a man can die but the ideas never will. There are such films that are like this. They tell a story so well, they build sets so beautifully, and they make a score so perfectly fitting that the audience will create a new reality within the film context. These films are the timeless ones, the classics such as Gone with the Wind and Casablanca.

In relation, this film can be a metaphor for the revolution that cinema viewing that it stirs within the audience. A film would present their ideals, convince the film viewers that, within the context, their ideals are right and just, and that their ideas can change the world. The film mirrors into itself and makes watching it a meta experience.

The scene where V took Evey as prisoner could be a symbol for how films take people as prisoners and inject into them a false sense of reality and changes their point of view in life. She finds a letter addressed to whoever is reading it. The letter is about the suffering and pain the writer had to go through because she was different and going against the moral standards of society. When people watch films, their sufffering will stem either from their misunderstanding of their film or if the film is not executed well enough to engage the audience.

Beyond their message of change through anarchy, the film strives to always bring rationality to the table. Like human nature, the two divides of the id and ego battle each other to produce a functional human being acceptable enough to present to a society that will chew it up and spit it out like any other anonymous statistic.

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1 Comment

Posted by on 25 May 2011 in Uncategorized

 

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One response to “You say you want a revolution

  1. enaescanan

    25 May 2011 at 9:00 pm

    In relation, this film can be a metaphor for the revolution that cinema viewing that it stirs within the audience. A film would present their ideals, convince the film viewers that, within the context, their ideals are right and just, and that their ideas can change the world. The film mirrors into itself and makes watching it a meta experience.

    I really like this analogy. I didn’t think of it that way before. I think you can also say that films also sometimes have to torture the viewers to make them see the truth similar to what V did to Natalie Portman’s character.

     

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